The sign of the unicorn. A fabric shop for 18th century reenactors and historians.

Silk Fabric | Cotton Fabric

Silk Fabric

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100% Silk, 48" wide
White Silk Duchess Satin
$45.99/yd.

This creamy white silk duchess satin was commonly used to make city women's cloaks, silk bonnets and for covering chip hats throughout the 18th century. White silk duchess was often used for women's gloves, mitts, gowns, and jackets. Men wore satin as jackets, coats and waistcoats. Cited in a newspaper ad in the 1775 Providence Gazette, "Stolen out of the Shop . . .  the following Articles, viz . . .  3 Dozen of black and white Silk Gloves, 4 Dozen of black and white Silk Mitts". For hand sewing try white medium weight silk.

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100% Silk, 54" wide
Grey Silk Taffaty WSV 178
$24/yd.

newA soft dove grey!

This interesting fabric is actually a changeable woven with the same two dove grey threads. Throughout the 18th century taffeta or taffaty was used for women's gowns, jackets, and petticoats. Men wore taffeta as jackets, coats and waistcoats and banyans. In The Boston Evening-Post a newspaper ad in 1775 included "To Be Sold, at the usual Prices, As the Seller is not desirous of taking any Advantage of the Scarcity of any Goods, at Jackson’s Variety Store, Next the Town-House . . .  an Assortment of Silks for the Ladies, English & India Taffaties, &c." cited in Wives, Slaves, and Servant Girls. For hand sewing grey quilter's silk may be the closest match to this fabric.

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100% Silk, 54" wide
Yellow Changeable Lutestring WSV 177
$24/yd.

newA lovely yellow!

Lutestring is one of the types of taffeta available during the 17th and 18th centuries. Lutestring was often changeable as is this plain weave changeable silk. This is made of a bright yellow that almost unperceivably changes to a greyish yellow. Throughout the 18th century taffeta was used for women's gowns, jackets, and petticoats. Men wore taffeta as jackets, coats and waistcoats and banyans. For example in the 1715 Proceedings of the Old Bailey "(a little Boy ) of Harrow on the Hill , was indicted for stealing 8 Yards of Lutestring". For hand sewing either drab or pale blue quilter's silk may be the closest match to this fabric.

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100% Silk, 54" wide
Orange Yellow Changeable Lutestring WSV 172
$24/yd.

newAn interesting subtle effect!

Lutestring is one of the types of taffeta available during the 17th and 18th centuries. Lutestring was often changeable as is this plain weave changeable silk. Although the end threads reveal this to be a bright orange, the soft natural yellow really tones this down to a complex earthy overall look. Throughout the 18th century taffeta was used for women's gowns, jackets, and petticoats. Men wore taffeta as jackets, coats and waistcoats and banyans. In the 1775 Essex Gazette published in Salem Massachusetts an advertisment informed "just imported in the last Ships from London, A large and beautiful Assortment of . . .  English & India Taffaties, 3-4 and half-ell changeable Lutestrings, black ditto, Mantua Silks" as cited in personal communication with Mike Barbieri. For hand sewing drab quilter's silk may be the closest match to this fabric.

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100% Silk, 54" wide
Green Gold Changeable Lutestring WSV 173
$24/yd.

newA gorgeous green!

Lutestring is one of the types of taffeta available during the 17th and 18th centuries. Lutestring was often changeable as is this plain weave changeable silk. This is made of a bright aqua green that changes to a sumptuously rich gold. Throughout the 18th century taffeta was used for women's gowns, jackets, and petticoats. Men wore taffeta as jackets, coats and waistcoats and banyans. For example in the 1715 Proceedings of the Old Bailey "(a little Boy ) of Harrow on the Hill , was indicted for stealing 8 Yards of Lutestring". For hand sewing buff quilter's silk may be the closest match to this fabric.

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100% Silk, 54" wide
Grey Beige Changeable Lutestring WSV 170
$24/yd.

newA beautiful combination!

Lutestring is one of the many types of taffeta available during the 17th and 18th centuries. This plain weave changeable silk is of a warm pinky beige that changes to a soft grey with a hint of blue. Throughout the 18th century taffeta was used for women's gowns, jackets, and petticoats. Men wore taffeta as jackets, coats and waistcoats and banyans. In The Pennsylvania Evening Post, of 1776, "Ran away . . .  an Irish servant girl . . .  She also took with her a changeable mantua gown" is cited in Wenches, Wives and Servant Girls. For hand sewing drab silk quilter's thread will match this fabric fairly well.

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100% Silk, 54" wide
Orange Olive Changeable Lutestring WSV 176
$24/yd.

newThe talk of the ball!

Lutestring is one of the types of taffeta available during the 17th and 18th centuries. Lutestring was often changeable as is this plain weave changeable silk. This is made of a bright orange that changes to a subdued shade of olive green resulting in a fantastic light earthy orange. Throughout the 18th century taffeta was used for women's gowns, jackets, and petticoats. Men wore taffeta as jackets, coats and waistcoats and banyans. In The Pennsylvania Evening Post a newspaper ad in 1776 included "Ran away . . .  an Irish servant girl . . .  She also took with her a changeable mantua gown" cited in Wives, Slaves, and Servant Girls. For hand sewing buff quilter's silk may be the closest match to this fabric.

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100% Silk, 54" wide
Blue Teal Changeable Lutestring WSV 169
$24/yd.

newEye catching!

Lutestring is one of the types of taffeta available during the 17th and 18th centuries. Lutestring was often changeable as is this plain weave ocean blue and aqua green changeable silk. Throughout the 18th century taffeta was used for women's gowns, jackets, and petticoats. Men wore taffeta as jackets, coats and waistcoats and banyans. In the 1775 Boston News-Letter an advertisment included "To Be Sold . . .  A fine Assortment of Ducapes, plain and changeable Lutestrings, some nice grey and bloom Ditto, India Taffities, Silk and Sattins for Cloaks, of all Prices" as cited in personal communication with Mike Barbieri. For hand sewing blue quilter's silk matches this fabric.

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100% Silk, 54" wide
Blue Gold Changeable Lutestring WSV 171
$24/yd.

newRich gold!

Lutestring is one of the types of taffeta available during the 17th and 18th centuries. Lutestring was often changeable as is this plain weave changeable silk. This is made of a soft greyish blue that changes to an sumptuous earthy gold. Throughout the 18th century taffeta was used for women's gowns, jackets, and petticoats. Men wore taffeta as jackets, coats and waistcoats and banyans. For example in the 1715 Proceedings of the Old Bailey "(a little Boy ) of Harrow on the Hill , was indicted for stealing 8 Yards of Lutestring". For hand sewing either drab or pale blue quilter's silk may be the closest match to this fabric.

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100% Silk, 54" wide
Claret Green Changeable Lutestring WSV 174
$24/yd.

newDark and mysterious!

Lutestring is one of the types of taffeta available during the 17th and 18th centuries. Lutestring was often changeable as is this plain weave changeable silk. This is made of a chocolate brown that changes to a claret color resulting in a complex dark brown with rich reddish overtones. Throughout the 18th century taffeta was used for women's gowns, jackets, and petticoats. Men wore taffeta as jackets, coats and waistcoats and banyans. For example in the 1746 Proceedings of the Old Bailey two woman were "indicted for stealing a Woman's Changeable Unwarer'd [sic Unwatered] Petticoat, Value 20 s." Watering was often done to silks to give an interesting effect to it. For hand sewing claret or brown quilter's silk may be the closest match to this fabric.

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100% Silk, 54" wide
Purple Grey Changeable Lutestring WSV 179
$24/yd.

newFantastic!

Lutestring is one of the types of taffeta available during the 17th and 18th centuries. Lutestring was often changeable as is this plain weave changeable silk. This combination of light purple changing to grey is such a fantastic combination. Throughout the 18th century taffeta was used for women's gowns, jackets, and petticoats. Men wore taffeta as jackets, coats and waistcoats and banyans. Silk garments were in the possession of the poor as well as the wealthy such as in this Pennsylvania Gazette ad of 1772, "Run away . . .  an indented servant woman . . .  says she was born near the city of Armagh, in Ireland . . .  had on, and took with her . . .  an old changeable silk bonnet, lined with blue silk, and tied with a white ribbon" as cited in Wives, Slaves, and Servant Girls. For hand sewing either grey quilter's silk may be the closest match to this fabric.

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100% Silk, 55" wide
Stripe Silk WSV 128
$22/yd.

Striped silk of this weight is great for gentlemen’s waistcoats and coats as well as lady's petticoats, gowns and jackets. Silk garments were in the possession of the poor as well as the wealthy such as in this Virginia Gazette ad of 1773, "RUN away . . .  a Convict Servant . . .  an Englishman; by Trade a Bricklayer . . .  with sundry other Clothes which he stole, namely . . .  a striped Silk Waistcoat." Tan silk thread will work well for hand sewing this silk.

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Pure silk taffeta for 17th century to the present reenactors, nautical historians and museum interpreters.

Green and Orange Stripe Satin, 100% Silk, 54" wide, $20/yd.
WSV 141

Silk has the benefit of taking and holding a wide range of colors. Imagine this silk as a gentlemen’s waistcoat or coat. Think of the statement a lady would make as she enters the room with the sound and drape of this silk as a gown, or jacket with a matching petticoat. Silk garments were often pawned such as in this theft trial in The Proceedings of the Old Bailey recorded in London in 1765 "she described them very particularly, and told where they were pawned: [among the garments listed were] . . .  a striped silk gown". Yellow orange medium weight silk thread will work well for hand sewing this silk. For sewing button holes several colors of silk quilter's thread could be used.

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100% Silk, 54" wide
Green and Yellow Stripe Satin WSV 139
$20/yd.

Silk fabric with a simple alternating pattern could make a strong statement as a gentlemen’s waistcoat and coat as well as a lady's petticoat, gown or jacket. Silk garments were in the possession of the poor as well as the wealthy such as in this Pennsylvania Gazette ad of 1781, "Ran Away . . .  a Negroe Woman . . .  She had a variety of clothes, among which are . . .  a striped silk jacket" as cited in Wives, Slaves, and Servant Girls. Ivory silk thread will work well for hand sewing this silk.

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Pure silk taffeta for 17th century to the present reenactors, nautical historians and museum interpreters.

Cross Barred Taffety, 100% Silk, 55" wide, $25/yd.
WSV 161

This cross bar has a 6 3/4" repeat of yellow and green stripes with three claret colored narrow lines surrounded with narrow very light gray lines. This would make an unforgettable gown, jacket or petticoat. Just as striking would be a gentlemen’s waistcoat or banyan. Taffety was often described in sale ads in America and Europe but they sometimes are included in runaway ads as well for example The Pennsylvania Gazette of 1774 "Run away . . .  two Irish servant women, one . . .  had on, and took with them . . .  one old taffaty gown, of a straw colour" cited in the book Wives, Slaves, and Servant Girls. Either yellow or light green quilter's thread would work well for sewing button holes.

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100% Silk, 54" wide
Green Striped Satin WSV 155
$20/yd.

This asymmetrical wide stripe satin is on a changeable green to light brown taffeta that could be used for a gentlemen’s waistcoat and coat or a lady's petticoat, gown or jacket. Silk garments were often stolen as in The Proceedings of the Old Bailey recorded in 1779 of a man and a woman who "were indicted, the first for feloniously stealing . . .  three striped silk gowns, value 28 s." Several colors of silk quilter's thread would be possible for button holes depending on the look you want.

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Pure silk taffeta for 17th century to the present reenactors, nautical historians and museum interpreters.

Claret and Gold Changeable Stripe, 100% Silk, 54" wide, $15/yd.
WSV 156

This simple stripe has a 7 3/4 inch stripe of gold and a 7 3/4 inch stripes of claret alternating. Each claret stripe changes to gold. This wide stripe taffeta could be used for a gentlemen’s waistcoat and coat or a lady's petticoat, gown or jacket. Silk garments were often stolen as in The Proceedings of the Old Bailey recorded in 1685 of a man "was Indicted for Stealing 19 Yards of striped Silk, value 4 l." Claret silk quilter's thread could be used for making buttonholes in this silk.

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100% Silk, 45" wide
Red Persian WSV 109
$20.00/yd.

Scarlet red silk as fine as this was used for neck handkerchiefs, and linings. Cited in

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100% Silk, 44" wide
Claret Colored Persian WSV 165
$14.99/yd.

newNew!

Claret silk as fine as this was used for neck handkerchiefs, and linings. For example in Wives, Slaves and Servant Girls there is an ad from The Virginia Gazette of 1774 that includes "Run away . . .  two convict servant women . . .  [one of them] took with her . . .  coloured handkerchiefs".

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100% Silk, 45" wide
Brown Persian WSV 108
$20/yd.

Brown silk as fine as this was used for neck handkerchiefs, linings and sometimes lining women's bonnets or chip (straw) hats. . Cited in Wives, Slaves, and Servant Girls The Pennsylvania Packet, of 1778, "Ran Away . . .  an indented girl . . .  country born . . .  had on and took with her, a brown silk bonnet".

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100% Silk, 45" wide
Chocolate Brown Persian WSV 168
$14.99/yd.

newNew!

Brown silk as fine as this was used for neck handkerchiefs, linings and sometimes lining women's bonnets or chip (straw) hats. . Cited in Wives, Slaves, and Servant Girls The Pennsylvania Packet, of 1778, "Ran Away . . .  an indented girl . . .  country born . . .  had on and took with her, a brown silk bonnet".

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100% Silk, 45" wide
Gold Persian WSV 104
$20/yd.

Gold silk fabric as fine as this was used for neck handkerchiefs and as a lining. Persian was used for lining women's bonnets or chip (straw) hats. In The Proceedings of the Old Bailey, London of 1767, "Richard Griffiths, and Mary his wife, otherwise Mary Pitt, spinster, otherwise Anne Taylor, spinster, were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Anne Nevell, widow . . .  and stealing . . .  a coloured silk handkerchief, the property of the said Anne Nevell".

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100% Silk, 45" wide
Drab Persian WSV 167
$14.99/yd.

newLimited supply!

Drab silk fabric as fine as this was used for neck handkerchiefs and as a lining. Persian was used for lining women's bonnets or chip (straw) hats. In The Proceedings of the Old Bailey, London of 1767, "Richard Griffiths, and Mary his wife, otherwise Mary Pitt, spinster, otherwise Anne Taylor, spinster, were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Anne Nevell, widow . . .  and stealing . . .  a coloured silk handkerchief, the property of the said Anne Nevell".

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100% Silk, 45" wide
Light Colored Persian WSV 166
$14.99/yd.

newLimited supply!

Drab silk fabric as fine as this was used for neck handkerchiefs and as a lining. Persian was used for lining women's bonnets or chip (straw) hats. In The Proceedings of the Old Bailey, London of 1767, "Richard Griffiths, and Mary his wife, otherwise Mary Pitt, spinster, otherwise Anne Taylor, spinster, were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Anne Nevell, widow . . .  and stealing . . .  a coloured silk handkerchief, the property of the said Anne Nevell".

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100% Silk, 45" wide
White Persian WSV 102
$20/yd.

This fine white silk was primarily used as a lining and hem facinings on women's gowns. White silk as fine as this can also be used for neck handkerchiefs, and men's cravats (aka neck cloths) and neck stocks. Sometimes Persian was used for lining women's bonnets or chip (straw) hats. In The Proceedings of the Old Bailey, London in 1758, "Arthur Hambleton was indicted for stealing . . .  one white silk lining to a gown". For hand sewing try fine white silk thread.

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100% Silk, 45" wide
Black Silk WSV 162
$20.00/yd.

This silk is a bit heavier than Persian but lighter weight than a taffeta and definitely lighter than Dutchess. Black silk was commonly used as a lining material but may also be used for neck handkerchiefs, the linings of some gentleman's hats appear in artwork to be lined in black silk, women's bonnets and chip (straw) hats can also be lined in this black silk but it's a bit thin for the outside covering. It may also be used for men's cravats (aka neck cloths) and neck stocks. In The Proceedings of the Old Bailey, London of 1775, "CHARLES M'GINNIS and ANN his wife, were indicted for stealing . . .  a piece of black silk lining, value two pence; a piece of black silk, value six-pence". For hand sewing try fine black silk thread.

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100% Silk, 45" wide
Black Persian WSV 100
$20.00/yd. $14.99/yd.

Fine black silk fabric was commonly used as a lining material but may also be used for neck handkerchiefs, the linings of women's bonnets and chip (straw) hats. It may also be used for men's cravats (aka neck cloths) and neck stocks. In The Proceedings of the Old Bailey, London of 1775, "CHARLES M'GINNIS and ANN his wife, were indicted for stealing . . .  a piece of black silk lining, value two pence; a piece of black silk, value six-pence". For hand sewing try fine black silk thread.

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100% Silk, 28 1/2" (72.4 cm) square
Black Handkerchief
$15

Black silk handkerchiefs were some of the most common handkerchiefs worn about the neck of both men and women throughout the 18th century. Black silk was especially worn by sailors but black silk handkerchiefs were often worn along with black silk bonnets and hats by women. Starting about 1800 these began to be called "neckerchief" although the term "handkerchief" persisted to the end of the 19th century. In the 18th century, when called "kerchief" it was preceded by the separate word "hand" making it "hand kerchief". These silk handkerchiefs have a rolled hem all the way around. In one corner is a "Made in India" label that can easily be cut out. From personal communication with Mike Barbieri in the 1775 Connecticut Journal, an ad included "Runaway . . .  two indented Servant Men, one . . .  a weaver by trade . . .  had on a . . .  black silk handkerchief".

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Silk Fabric | Cotton Fabric

Cotton Fabric

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100% Cotton, Brown Corduroy, 60" wide, 6 wales/inch, WCN 309
$10/yd.

Corduroy was first advertised in London in 1756 but did not become popular until the late 1780s. From the late 1780s and into the 19th century corduroy was commonly used for working class men’s waistcoats breeches and tousers and children's clothing. For example in The Proceedings of the Old Bailey, London in 1788 a man was "was indicted for burglariously and feloniously breaking and entering" a list of items were stolen including "a pair of corduroy breeches, value 10 s." Brown linen thread for hand sewing will match this fabric as will dark brown quilter's thread for sewing button holes.

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100% Cotton, Striped Brown Corduroy, 51" wide, 6 wales/inch, WCN 310
$10/yd.

This corduroy has two dark brown pin stripes in an orangey brown ground. Corduroy was first advertised in London in 1756 but did not become popular until the late 1780s. From the late 1780s and into the 19th century corduroy was commonly used for working class men’s waistcoats breeches and trousers and children's clothing. For example in the 1772 New-London Gazette an ad included, "Ran away . . .  an Apprentice Boy . . .  Had on . . .  striped Wale Trowsers" as cited in personal communication with Mike Barbieri. Cinnamon brown linen thread will blend with this fabric as will cinnamon brown buttonhole twist for sewing button holes.

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Sheer sprigged cotton for 19th century to the present reenactors, nautical historians and museum interpreters.

100% Cotton, Claret Sprigged Muslin, 42" wide, $15/yd.
WCN 127

Muslin began being imported to Europe in the 17th century and some said they were so fine you could hardly feel them in your hand. Sprigged muslin first appears in quantity toward the end of the American War for Independence and soon was used in making empire style gowns, handkerchiefs and chemisettes. In the The Proceedings of the Old Bailey, London of 1813, a witness said, "they asked for some sprigged muslin. I shewed them some muslins myself; at the same time I was shewing another customer some handkerchiefs. I left the customer to shew them the muslin, and while I turned round to fell the price of the handkerchief, Jones took the muslin. I missed the muslin in about five minutes after. Q. What was the quantity of that piece of muslin that was missed - A. Five yards. That was sprigged muslin. I asked them six shillings a yard for it. Jones went out of the shop, telling Williams that they were cheap." White linen thread for hand sewing will match this fabric.

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Sheer sprigged cotton for 19th century to the present reenactors, nautical historians and museum interpreters.

100% Cotton, Gold Sprigged Muslin, 42" wide, $15/yd.
WCN 128

Muslin began being imported to Europe in the 17th century and some said they were so fine you could hardly feel them in your hand. Sprigged muslin first appears in quantity toward the end of the American War for Independence and soon was used in making empire style gowns, handkerchiefs and chemisettes. At a shop in London called Walker, a trade card published between 1757 to 1758 included "plain sprig'd and strip'd muslins". Off white linen thread for hand sewing will match this fabric.

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Sheer sprigged cotton for 19th century to the present reenactors, nautical historians and museum interpreters.

100% Cotton, Olive Sprigged Muslin, 42" wide, $15/yd.
WCN 129

Muslin began being imported to Europe in the 17th century and some said they were so fine you could hardly feel them in your hand. Sprigged muslin first appears toward the end of the American War for Independence and soon was used in making empire style gowns, handkerchiefs and chemisettes. At a shop in London called Walker, a trade card published between 1757 to 1758 included "plain sprig'd and strip'd muslins". Off white linen thread for hand sewing will match this fabric.

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Sheer sprigged cotton for 19th century to the present reenactors, nautical historians and museum interpreters.

100% Cotton, Claret Flowered Muslin, 42" wide, $15/yd.
WCN 130

This white muslin has white vines with light pink flowers. Muslin began being imported to Europe in the 17th century and some said they were so fine you could hardly feel them in your hand. Sprigged muslin first appears in quantity toward the end of the American War for Independence and soon was used in making empire style gowns, handkerchiefs and chemisettes. In the The Proceedings of the Old Bailey, London of 1813, a witness said, "they asked for some sprigged muslin. I shewed them some muslins myself; at the same time I was shewing another customer some handkerchiefs. I left the customer to shew them the muslin, and while I turned round to fell the price of the handkerchief, Jones took the muslin. I missed the muslin in about five minutes after. Q. What was the quantity of that piece of muslin that was missed - A. Five yards. That was sprigged muslin. I asked them six shillings a yard for it. Jones went out of the shop, telling Williams that they were cheap." Off white linen thread for hand sewing will match this fabric.

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Sheer sprigged cotton for 19th century to the present reenactors, nautical historians and museum interpreters.

100% Cotton, Pink Flowered Muslin, 42" wide, $15/yd.
WCN 131

This white muslin has white vines with light pink flowers. Muslin began being imported to Europe in the 17th century and some said they were so fine you could hardly feel them in your hand. Sprigged muslin first appears in quantity toward the end of the American War for Independence and soon was used in making empire style gowns, handkerchiefs and chemisettes. In the The Proceedings of the Old Bailey, London of 1813, a witness said, "they asked for some sprigged muslin. I shewed them some muslins myself; at the same time I was shewing another customer some handkerchiefs. I left the customer to shew them the muslin, and while I turned round to fell the price of the handkerchief, Jones took the muslin. I missed the muslin in about five minutes after. Q. What was the quantity of that piece of muslin that was missed - A. Five yards. That was sprigged muslin. I asked them six shillings a yard for it. Jones went out of the shop, telling Williams that they were cheap." Off white linen thread for hand sewing will match this fabric.

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100% Cotton, Ivory Striped Cotton Gauze, 45" wide
WCC 107
$10/yd.

Very sheer cotton gauze was used in the 18th century for lady's aprons and handkerchiefs. Later it was used for the lightweight empire style gowns of the Napolionic period. For example in The New York Gazette, of 1775, "Run away . . .  in the city of New York . . .  a servant girl . . .  born in Scotland, and came from there thirteen months ago . . .  had on and took with her . . .  four handkerchiefs, one a red and white speckled cotton, a gauze, a linen, and one a lawn" is cited in Wives, Slaves, and Servant Girls. Off white 60/2 linen thread will match this fabric when hand sewing or try very fine white silk thread. The picture is taken on a black background with the penny on top and a slight fold to give you an idea of how sheer this cotton is.

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100% Cotton, Dotted Swiss, 54" wide
WCC 103
$12.00/yd.

Dotted swiss is a sheer cotton fabric with dots woven into the fabric. It is said to have been first made in 1750 and became more abundant in about the 1790s. Dotted swiss is one of the sheer cottons that work well for empire style gowns. White 60/2 linen thread for hand sewing will match this fabric.

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100% Italian Cotton Book Muslin, White, 45" wide
WCN 111
$16.00/yd.

This fine Italian cotton is perfect for ruffled and pleated caps and fine ruffles on shirts! Today this fabric is called organdy, but historically was a type of muslin often referred to as book muslin. Italian book muslin is a medium grade and one step up from that listed as just book muslin. This fine stiff cotton was used to make shirt and shift ruffles, women's caps, aprons, and handkerchiefs starting in about the 1760s and continuing to the present. Book muslin has a crisp look and holds its shape well. In the The Proceedings of the Old Bailey, London of 1784, one woman "was indicted for feloniously stealing . . .  one book muslin half handkerchief, value 6 d." For hand sewing use 60/2 linen thread or fine silk thread.

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100% Cotton Book Muslin, White, 61" wide
WCN 110
$8.00/yd.

White cotton book muslin is now called organdy but was historically referred to as book muslin because when folded on a bolt it has the appearance of pages of paper. This fine stiff cotton was used to make shirt and shift ruffles, women's caps, aprons, and handkerchiefs starting in the 1760s and continuing to the present. Book muslin has a crisp look and holds its shape well. In The Proceedings of the Old Bailey, London of 1770, a number of villains "were indicted, the first for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of James Wood . . .  and stealing . . .  a pair of book muslin ruffles, value 3 s." For hand sewing 60/2 linen thread will work well.

Silks | Cottons

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