The sign of the unicorn. A fabric shop for 18th century reenactors and historians.

18th and Early 19th Century Ready Made Items

Pocketbooks | Haversacks, Wallets, Bags | Women's Pockets | Stockings | Mitts | Neckwear | Household | Women's Hats | Men's Caps

Pocketbooks

Pocketbooks (what we call wallets today) were commonly used by both men and women in the 18th to early 19th century in a great variety of styles from plain to quite elaborate. Usually pocketbooks were worked in either leather or needlework. For example from personal communication with Mike Barbieri in the 1775 New England Chronicle, or Essex Gazette an ad included, "Stolen . . .  a worked pocket-book, containing about 15s. in money, and inlisting orders, signed by Ezekiel Scott, Capt."

Many pocketbooks were fairly plain but others were very decorative worked leather. Some leather pocketbooks were embroidered and some closed with a metal clasp of brass, silver or gold. For example see the 1757-1758 trade card of Peter Jacob at the Bible and Letter-Case in Bartholomew Close, London.

A red leather pocketbook with buff colored interior.

$39.00-$44.00

Add Leather Pocketbook to Cart

Pocketbooks | Haversacks, Wallets, Bags | Women's Pockets | Stockings | Mitts | Neckwear | Household | Women's Hats | Men's Caps

Women's Pockets

Women's pockets tied around the waist usually under the petticoat as a seperate piece of clothing throughout the 18th and into the early 19th century. Our pockets are all hand sewn of either linen or cotton and inspired in shape, structure and desgin by numerous originals. For example in The Proceedings of the Old Bailey in 1764 two men "were indicted, for that they, on the 24th of March , about the hour of nine at night, the dwelling house of George Rice , Esq ; did break and enter, and stealing . . .  the property of Anne Brown, spinster; one linen pocket, one worsted pocket".

A hand made pocket.

$39.95-$49.95

Add Woman's Pocket to Cart

Pocketbooks | Haversacks, Wallets, Bags | Women's Pockets | Stockings | Mitts | Neckwear | Household | Women's Hats | Men's Caps

home
Top

Stockings

Dark grey wool ribbed stockings.

Wool Stockings

It seems as though 18th century stockings flood the market in many colors, fibers and weaves with disregard to the research. Wm. Booth, Draper has hand selected the most historically appropriate machine made stockings based on primary research done by Paul Dickfoss and published in The Brigade Dispatch called "Stockings of Runaways Advertised in Rhode Island 1760-1783" researches working with data from other colonies have cooberated the research. This research is further suplimented by the work in the book Cloth and Costume. These smooth machine knit wool stockings will keep your feet warm and comfortable was likely the most common color of stocking. Cited in Wives, Slaves, and Servant Girls The Pennsylvania Gazette of 1775 "Run away . . .  three Dutch servants; two . . .  man and wife . . .  the first . . .  had on . . .  white yarn stockings . . .  his wife . . .  had on . . .  white yarn stockings . . .  The other . . .  is a Butcher by trade . . .  had on, and took with him . . .  one pair of white yarn stockings".

$30.00-$36.00

Add Wool Stockings to Cart

home
Top
White silk stockings.

White Silk Stockings

These smooth machine knit creamy white silk stockings feel ever so soft next to your skin and are just right for a hot weekend. Cited in The Proceedings of the Old Bailey of 1767 during deposition in a theft trial a woman "crying old clothes" reported, "he offered me a pair of white silk stockings for 3 s. I said, I'll give you two; he agreed for that; said he, I have another pair to sell; I said, I'll buy them; said he, I have got eleven pair more, and put them in my hands".

$20.00-$24.00

Add White Silk Stockings to Cart

home
Top

Pocketbooks | Haversacks, Wallets, Bags | Women's Pockets | Stockings | Mitts | Neckwear | Household | Women's Hats | Men's Caps

Mitts

new Sorry, but these wont last and we wont keep up!

These hand knit mitts are made of stocking weight 100% wool that is mule spun (which simulates hand spun). These incorporate details from extant mitts that are hand knit or are repurposed stockings. Furthermore, there is a reference in Linda Baumgarten's What Clothes Reveal in which a knitter advertises that she will remake old stockings into mitts.

Several examples of hand knit mitts.

$55.00-$59.00

Add Women's Hand Knit Mitts to Cart

home
Top

Pocketbooks | Haversacks, Wallets, Bags | Women's Pockets | Stockings | Mitts | Neckwear | Household | Women's Hats | Men's Caps

Haversacks, Wallets, Bags

Haversack
$49.95-$52.95

These handsewn haversacks are copied from an original c. 1770s British haversack formerly in the private collection of J. Craig Nannos. Our reproductions are either stamped with the broad arrow and GR for British soldiers or made without for American soldiers. This is made from oatmeal osnabirg linen, 16 ¾" (42.5 cm.) wide by 13 ½" (34.3 cm.) tall. Unlike the original, that has buttons our reproduction lacks buttons. It appears the buttons may have been added later since the shoulder strap is sewn through to the flap which results in no need for buttons. Also, three buttons are seen in artwork whereas the original had only two buttons sewn with a heavier thread than the rest of the haversack. This haversack is described in great detail by Roy Najecki and it is with great thanks Roy has inspected this reproduction and gave it the nod of approval.

The shoulder strap on the original haversack, excluding the 3" (7.6 cm.) sewn to the sack, is 34" (86.4 cm) long which fits most people. When worn correctly the bottom of the haversack should be about level with your wrist. For a 1776 description "a Soldier cannot conveniently get through the Duties of a Campaign, without a Haversack of strong, coarse, grey linen (which is always issued as part of the Camp-equipage) to carry his bread and provisions on a March" Cuthbertson wrote on page 85 in item XLIV.

Haversacks are really easy to make, just time consuming. If you'd like to make your own a kit is included here Add Haversack Kit to Cart

Haversack used in the British and American Army in the second half of the 18th century.

Add Haversack to Cart
home
Top

Wallet
$44.95

new A convienet carrying bag!

A Pocket Dictionary (1758) defines a wallet as "A travelling bag, with the mouth or entrance in the middle, to carry goods in each end." This reproduction is based on an original in the Sebastian Goundie House at Historic Bethlehem, PA. Wallets were usually carried over the shoulder or back of a horse to hold clothing, tools and other items whereas pocketbooks fit into the pocket to carry money. Some refer to these as "market wallets" but It appears the common term is simply "wallet".

Often, modern people portraying civilians carry a haversack to carry their goods. But a haversack is a distinctly military item used to carry food on the march that hasn't been found described on civilians. For some militia regiment's there's no record of haversacks being issued. A wallet can serve the same purpose & is well documented used both in the military as well as civilian. For example in The Proceedings of the Old Bailey in 1757 "We opened the wallet, in which we found a pair of stone buttons, a cap and a shirt."

A hand sewn wallet of oatmeal linen.

Add Wallet to Cart
home
Top

Pocketbooks | Haversacks, Wallets, Bags | Women's Pockets | Stockings | Mitts | Neckwear | Household | Women's Hats | Men's Caps

Neckwear

White linen stock.

White Silk Fringed Cravat

White cravats (aka neck cloth) were most often worn by civilian gentlemen in the first half of the 18th century with a shirt that lacks bosom ruffles. Cravats persisted into the early 19th century. Cravats were made with fringe at the bottom edge That was exposed while wearing into the 1770s. Often after this the waistcoat was buttoned higher concealing the fringed edge. White neck cloths, usually, were made of a shirt weight linen but these silk ones are a cost effective option with a hand sewn rolled hem.

$15.00

Add White Silk Fringed Cravat to Cart

home
Top

100% Cotton, square
$38

These 36" (91 cm) square handkerchiefs, or fichu in French, are inspired by both extant handkerchiefs as well as those seen in period artwork. Starting about 1800 these began to be called "neckerchief" although the term "handkerchief" persisted to the end of the 19th century. In the 18th century, when called "kerchief" it was preceded by the separate word "hand" making it "hand kerchief" despite the fact they were intended for both pocket as well as to be worn about the neck. These hand block printed cotton handkerchiefs have a rolled hem all the way around and are made of a very soft, fine handkerchief cotton, finer than many others being sold so that when tied or bunched up at the back of your neck the handkerchief still sits well. As an example in the 1776 Pennsylvania Gazette an ad included “Run away . . .  an indented servant girl . . .  a Scotch woman . . .  had on, and took with her . . .  two handkerchiefs, one blue and white, the other red and white” cited in the book Wives, Slaves, and Servant Girls.

Hand wash in warm water.

A sprigged cotton handkerchief in red on a white ground for historical reenactors and museum interpretors.

Add Cotton Handkerchief to Cart
home
Top

100% Silk, square
Handkerchief
$15-20

Silk handkerchiefs, or fichu in French, were by all classes within 18th century society. More expensive than cotton, linen or wool handkerchiefs, silk handkerchiefs were relativly small and still within comfortable reach of working class people. Silk also tends to be warmer in winter than cotton. Starting about 1800 these began to be called "neckerchief" although the term "handkerchief" persisted to the end of the 19th century. In the 18th century, when called "kerchief" it was preceded by the separate word "hand" making it "hand kerchief". These silk handkerchiefs have a rolled hem all the way around. In one corner is a "Made in India" label that can easily be cut out. As an example, from personal communication with Mike Barbieri in the 1775 Connecticut Journal, an ad included "Runaway . . .  two indented Servant Men, one . . .  a weaver by trade . . .  had on a . . .  black silk handkerchief".

home
Top

Pocketbooks | Haversacks, Wallets, Bags | Women's Pockets | Stockings | Mitts | Neckwear | Household | Women's Hats | Men's Caps

Household

A tin of Poland starch.

Poland Starch

Blueing and starching our laundry is a bit of a forgotten art. Today we grab a spray bottle and call it good, but our foremothers had a much different approach. Along with this tin of starch are directions for starching your linens in a period correct manner. A trade card for Nathan Drake, colour man, at the White Lyon in James Street, Covent Garden near Long Acre, London advertises that it "Sells all sorts of . . . Poland & common starch & c."

$10.00/tin

Add Poland Starch to Cart

$20.00/kit of both Prussian Blue and Poland Starch

Add Blueing and Starching Kit to Cart

home
Top
A bottle of Prussian blue.

Prussian Blue

Blueing and starching our laundry is a bit of a forgotten art. Today we dump in some modern chemical bleach and call it good, but our foremothers had a much different approach. Along with this bottle of Prussian blue are directions for starching and blueing your linens in a period correct manner. A trade card for Robert Jenkin, oil-man, at the Oil Jar, in Fleet Street near the Market, London advertises that it he "Sells all sorts of fine oils likewise . . . powland &c. comn. starch . . . common powder blue". No need to fear, there is no oil in our blueing. This oil man sold more than oil, he sold all sorts of household items.

$12.00/bottle

Add Prussian Blue to Cart

$20.00/kit of both Prussian Blue and Poland Starch

Add Blueing and Starching Kit to Cart

home
Top

Mrs. Phillips Baudruches Fines
$18.00

This is a reproduction sheep bladder prophylactic with a silk ribbon tie at the bottom to hold it on. Although this is a faithful reproduction it is not intended for sexual use. It is meant to be used as an amusement and educational device. Instructions for how it was used in the 18th century are included.

Mrs. Phillips Baudruches Fines.

Add Mrs. Phillips Baudruches Fines to Cart
home
Top
Bee's wax candles.

Candles, Bee's Wax

Bee's wax candles are clean, natural, dripless and slow burning. Pure bee's wax candles are very slow burning so you can expect an hour of beautiful soft yellow light per inch. These candles are 6 inches long so expect each to burn (when properly trimmed and erect) for 6 hours.

Bee's wax was used to wax and smooth the outside of linen thread so the thread does not fray as it is pulled through the fabric. A candle may be used for this purpose just as a cake is. Just hold the thread against the candle with your finger and pull the thread. Coat both sides and sew. Wax may also be used to initially hold thread on thread winders and to keep tops on containers.

$2.00/each
$22.00/dozen

Add Candles, Bee's Wax to Cart

Add One Dozen Bee's Wax Candles to Cart

home
Top

Brass Candle Snuffer
$65.00

newNew item for us but old!

This is a solid brass, vintage, candle snuffer consistent in design as to those from the second half of the 18th century.

A brass candle snuffer.

Add Brass Candle Snuffer to Cart
home
Top
Individual and paper packs of one dozen sulfur matches.

Sulfur Matches, One Dozen

Sometimes found under the name of spunks these matches began to appear at the end of the 17th century. They were handy in that a spark caught in char cloth will easily and quickly ignite the sulfur on the match igniting the wood. These matches are covered in sulfur at both ends so that two ignitions can be gotten from each match. In The Proceedings of the Old Bailey, London of 1715, in a theft trial a witness stated that when the prisoner was searched "a Tobacco-Box, with Tinder and Matches in it, were found in his Pocket."

$5.00/dozen

Add Sulfur Matches, One Dozen to Cart

home
Top

Pocketbooks | Haversacks, Wallets, Bags | Women's Pockets | Stockings | Mitts | Neckwear | Household | Women's Hats | Men's Caps

Women's Straw Hats

Straw hats c. 1730-1800.

Women's Straw Hats

new You'll stand out with black satin!

This straw hat measures 13" in diameter and has a low crown of about 1 1/2". These hats were meant to sit on top of the head. To keep your hat on, the women would use a silk ribbon that attaches to the hat on the crown and tied under the chin or behind your neck. Sometimes a hat pin was used pushed threw the crown and into the hair to assist the silk tie. These hats were often decorated with wide silk ribbons around the crown and occasionally birds or silk flowers. Most commonly the hat is covered in black or white silk (and sometimes other colors) usually the underside is lined in the same color of silk but sometimes red, white, blue lined the underside regardless if the top is covered. This hat is shown plain and sold this way for you to decorate as you like. Women of the 18th century wore these hats over their linen or cotton cap when outside most commonly in the early to mid century. Bonnets were also worn over the cap while outside but became more common after the 1760s although hats remained common. For example as found in Wives, Slaves, and Servant Girls in the Pennsylvania Packet of 1775 "Ran Away . . .  a servant girl . . .  had one when she went away, a . . .  straw hat.".

$25.75-27.75/each

Add Women's Straw Hat to Cart

Pocketbooks | Haversacks, Wallets, Bags | Women's Pockets | Stockings | Mitts | Neckwear | Household | Women's Hats | Men's Caps

Men's Caps

Linen cap commonly worn c. 1730-1800 to bed or in shops.

Men's Linen Indoor Work or Night Caps

These caps were worn c. 1730-1800 inside for work but also used as night caps. Ours are made of a fine unbleached linen and are between 12-15" tall even with 2" turned up at the brim. We only have a few ready made that range from around 21-22" hat size that may be somewhat adjusted by how you turn up the bottom. The top is gathered with a seam along one side. These are made based on many period paintings and prints along with two original caps. For example in The Proceedings of the Old Bailey in 1771 a "spinster , was indicted for stealing two linen shirts, value 2 s. two check aprons, value 6 d. one linen apron, value 6 d. two muslin neckcloths, value 1 s. one pair of thread stockings, value 4 d. and one plain linen cap, value 2 d. the property of Edward Fawcer".

$45.00/each

Add Men's Unbleached Linen Indoor Work Cap to Cart

Add Men's Off White Linen Indoor Work Cap to Cart

Men's Hand Knit Caps

Invincible caps in several variations.

HMS Invincible Cap

The original cap this one is based off of was recovered from the HMS Invincible that sank in 1758. Our reproductions are made of various mule spun wools (mule spinning simulates hand spinning) with rows of stripes with a tassel on top. These caps fit a hat size of 21-26". The caps themselves are about 10 3/4" tall with a 2" fold over sewn in to the top. These caps have not been fulled.

$75.00/each

Add HMS Invincible Cap to Cart

home
Top
The Latrine cap reproduction.

Latrine Cap

Because the original was found in a latrine within the hospital of the French colony of Louisbourg in Nova Scotia, Canada, this cap has become known as the "latrine cap". It was dropped into the latrine sometime between 1730 and 1758. Our reproduction is made of dark brown mule spun wool (mule spinning simulates hand spinning) and will fit a hat size of 22". The cap itself is 10" tall and has not been fulled.

$50.00/each

Add HMS Invincible Cap to Cart

home
Top
Knit caps worn between the 1740s & 1790s.

Men's Hand Knit English Striped Caps

Worn between the 1740s & 1790s these striped outdoors caps are seen on English landsmen & sailors. Unlike Monmouth caps which appear to be worn by mariners and Negro slaves these caps are frequently seen in pictures of common English landsmen. Most often the striped caps are found with red white and blue stripes but sometimes as just red and white stripe. Whatever style you choose you'll be worm & well documented.

$55.00/each

Add Hand Knit English Striped Cap to Cart

Pocketbooks | Haversacks, Wallets, Bags | Women's Pockets | Stockings | Mitts | Neckwear | Household | Women's Hats | Men's Caps

home
Top